Category Archives: Family events

The University of Findlay adds solar, wind power to campus

The University of Findlay recently installed solar panels and a wind turbine to provide power to two student houses on West Foulke Avenue.

Last fall, the University received grants from both the BP Foundation and Dominion Resources to help retrofit two University-owned houses with renewable energy and monitoring equipment.

In June, solar power was grid tied to 138 W. Foulke Ave., and wind power was grid tied to 146 W. Foulke Ave. A grid tie, by definition, is an electrical system that is connected to a utility distribution grid. In this case, solar power and wind power are connected to a local electrical grid. Power will be generated for each house, and excess power will be returned to the grid.

The new power systems were installed in an open lot east of 138 W. Foulke Ave.

Students, with guidance from Tim Murphy, Ph.D., associate professor of environmental, safety and health management, assisted with preparing the site and installing the solar panels and wind turbine. They also installed a fence around the site.

Dan Klear of Superior Energy Solutions LLC, a company based in Ottawa, was on site to oversee the installation of the wind turbine, which stands approximately 45 feet tall. Each of its three fiberglass composite blades spans six feet.

ASHLAND PLANS ART CLASS – Ashland University’s Coburn Gallery will be offering an art class titled “Pre-K Picasso’s,” an educational and creative experience for children 3 to 5 years old who are accompanied by a parent.

“Pre-K Picasso’s” will be offered on Tuesday, July 10, from 2 to 3 p.m. in Room 346 located in the Center for the Arts on the Ashland University campus. Registration is required.

The July 10 session of “Pre-K Picasso’s” will feature painting and collage techniques to explore with young artists. The cost is $10 per child and enrollment is limited. For more information or to register your child for classes, call 419-289-5652.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Thursday’s View From The Pugh column features upcoming local events. E-mail
viewfromthepugh@yahoo.com to submit an item for consideration for a future column).

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Working to save the hellbenders

Call them snot otters, devil dogs, mud cats, mollyhuggers or Allegheny alligators but a team of Ohio conservationists are dedicated to making certain the endangered eastern hellbender is never called extinct.

The first release of human-reared hellbenders in Ohio occurred on June 15 and marks an important step in the Ohio Division of Wildlife’s Conservation Plan to reverse the precipitous decline of the species by expanding their range into previously occupied streams to eventually establish multiple self-sustaining populations in Ohio.

The nine released hellbenders were reared in a dedicated hellbender facility at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium from eggs collected in 2007 by the Oglebay Good Zoo (Wheeling, WV). They were released into a stream in eastern Ohio where hellbenders were once found. The stream was once severely impacted by pollution but has since recovered and is one of the highest quality waterways in the state.

Scientists from the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources released the hellbenders after Zoo veterinarians performed health screenings and surgically implanted radio-transmitters to enable the animals to be tracked. Blood samples and skin swabs will be collected from the released hellbenders at the end of the summer and compared with those collected prior to the release. Veterinarians from the Columbus Zoo and the Wilds have been conducting research on the health of Ohio and West Virginia hellbenders since 2006. Data from this project will inform future hellbender reintroductions in Ohio.

CEO TO SPEAK AT WORKSHOP – Nationwide Children’s Hospital CEO Steve Allen, MD, will serve as co-chair of the first Transforming Duchenne Care workshop to be held June 27 and 28 in Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

The national symposium, held by Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy, will gather leadership from top medical institutions, neuromuscular experts and patient representatives with the ultimate goal of establishing a network of centers of excellence for the care and treatment of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Thursday’s View From The Pugh column features upcoming local events. E-mail
viewfromthepugh@yahoo.com to submit an item for consideration for a future column).

Thanks, Dad

(EDITOR’S NOTE: This guest blog is courtesy of Brian Elder and allclients.com).

Great fathers are like great sportsmen who hone their skills and become experts at their crafts.

So says Coach Tony Dungy, and his words are worth remembering.

In his classic article written in 2002, Dungy said, “As we study all-pro dads, we discover that they share four patterns. They spend time with their children; they are compassionate toward their children; and they love and respect their children’s mother and they turn to their faith for strength.

“A compassionate father is patient with his children. He doesn’t expect them to be perfect, and he tries to empathize by putting himself in their shoes. His love is unconditional, and he lets them know it.”

The importance of the father in the home is shockingly apparent in statistics on juvenile delinquency.

In a classic 1990 study of teen criminality, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development found an ‘alarmingly high’ prevalence of behavioral problems among all children from families without a father present.

Bureau of Justice Statistics found that 72 percent of incarcerated juveniles grew up in one-parent homes, mostly deprived of a father.
Non-resident fathers remain crucial to child development. Involved non-resident fathers help improve children’s grades and promote better social and behavioral skills.

Bottom line: Dads are essential for families and society. On June 17, don’t forget to say….. ………………….Thanks Dad!

Ashland sets academic-themed days for summer

The Ashland University Office of Admissions has partnered with all academic departments on campus and will provide interactive Summer Visit Programs that will allow prospective students to investigate the college majors and careers which they are considering.

“The summer 2012 visit days are set up to allow prospective students to experience Ashland University in a number of ways, including spending time with faculty and students as well as asking questions of admissions representatives,” said W.C. Vance, director of undergraduate admissions. “These programs are more comprehensive than traditional campus visits because of the heavy academic and career component.”

Vance said the Summer Visit Programs also will include a campus tour as well as an overview of scholarships and next steps for students considering Ashland University.

“These unique summer events will allow prospective students and their parents to explore college majors that will help guide the students to career choices after graduation,” he said.

The Summer Visit Programs schedule is as follows:

Exploring Careers in Health – Friday, July 13, from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Exploring Careers in Education – Monday, July 16, from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Exploring Careers in Business – Friday, July 20, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Exploring Careers in Sports – Friday, July 27, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Exploring Careers in Arts – Friday, Aug. 3, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Exploring Careers in Law and Service Professions – Friday, Aug. 10, from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Those wanting more information regarding the Summer Visit Programs or wanting to register for an event, can go to http://event.ashland.edu or can call 800.882.1548 ext. 5052.

FINDLAY GRAD HONORED – Elise DeCola, a 2008 UF graduate, recently was awarded a regional Emmy Award for a weekend newscast.

The award was presented to DeCola by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Lower Great Lakes Chapter. DeCola was recognized for her work as a producer for WTVG 13 ABC Action News in Toledo.

DeCola graduated from Findlay with a bachelor’s degree in communication.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Thursday’s View From The Pugh column features upcoming local events. E-mail
viewfromthepugh@yahoo.com to submit an item for consideration for a future column).

Nationwide Children’s Hospital plans community day Sunday

Nationwide Children’s Hospital will host a Community Celebration Day 11 a.m.-4 p.m. June 10.

The hospital is located at the corner of Livingston and Parsons Avenues in Columbus.

The day will feature hospital tours, interactive activities, storytelling, COSI science kiosks, “Touch a Truck” and animal visitors from the Columbus Zoo.

GET READY FOR SUMMER – With Ohioans eager to enjoy the summertime weather, Lieutenant Governor and Department of Insurance Director Mary Taylor is encouraging people to conduct an insurance review of their summertime activities to help prevent against a financial setback if an unfortunate incident were to occur.

“Summer in Ohio is about enjoying all of the great outdoor activities our state has to offer,” Taylor said. “As you plan your summertime activities, you should take time to make sure your insurance needs are met with the policies you currently have.”

Taylor said it is important to talk with your agent and let them know about any lifestyle changes you may have experienced and whether or not your coverage is adequate for your summertime plans.

ASHLAND PLANS PHOTO CONTEST – The Coburn Gallery at Ashland University is hosting a call for entries for a regional juried exhibition of photographs, both traditional and digital, that will be featured in an exhibition titled “Ashland – New Photography.”

The exhibition will feature two categories: photographs taken by artists 18 and over plus a special category for young artists 17 years and younger. Cash awards will be given to Best in Show in each category as well as two honorable mentions.

The exhibition is only open to artists residing in Ashland County. A maximum of two entries for $15 are allowed per artist 18 years and older, while the entry fee is waived for younger artists.

All work must be original art conceived and executed solely by the artist within the last two years. All artwork must be matted and framed properly and work previously exhibited at the Coburn Gallery is not eligible. Entries will be juried from the actual artworks.

The delivery of entries will be on Tuesday, June 19, from 12 to 6 p.m. and Wednesday, June 20, from 12 to 4 p.m. The exhibit runs from June 29 through July 31, 2012. There will be an opening reception on Friday, June 29, from 6 to 7 p.m. with the awards announced at 6:30 p.m. Declined artworks may be picked up on Friday, June 22, from 12 to 4 p.m.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Thursday’s View From The Pugh column features upcoming local events. E-mail
viewfromthepugh@yahoo.com to submit an item for consideration for a future column).

Malone official recognized for energy efficiency project

Malone University’s director of physical plant, Jim Palone, was recently notified that the University was awarded a certificate of recognition from AEP Ohio for a completed energy efficiency project as part of the company’s Business Incentives Program. The Malone initiative will reduce energy use by 36048 kWh per year, and reduce CO2 emissions by 30.8 tons. Specifically, Malone reduced energy use through a gym lighting retrofit project that replaced forty 375 watt metal halide light fixtures with forty T8 florescent fixtures.

This is the equivalent of as many as five cars off the road per year.

AEP expressed its gratitude to Malone University for its commitment to energy efficiency and the environment by participating in AEP’s Ohio’s savings incentives program for business in a statement recognizing the University for exhibiting leadership in environmental awareness and sustainability as an early adopter of energy efficiency and environmentalism.

According to Palone, The maintenance department also replaced over 500 T12 bulbs and 220 magnetic ballasts with energy efficient T8 bulbs and electronic ballasts throughout the campus. The AEP Gridsmart Program has afforded Malone University a great opportunity to continue our effort to become as energy efficient as possible.

YOU CAN RENT ASHLAND’S REC CENTER – Are you looking for a location to hold a family reunion, graduation party, or birthday party?

The Ashland University Rec Center has a variety of indoor and outdoor facilities available to rent, which include an aerobics room, a game room, pool, racquetball courts, gym courts, MAC court, intramural field, and sand volleyball courts. During the summer, these spaces may be rented Monday-Saturday: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday: 12 to 9 p.m. In addition, entire facility rentals are offered during non-operational hours.

If you are interested in renting space within the facility, go to: http://www.ashland.edu/students/rec-services/facilities/rental-fees and click on “Facility Reservation Form” then return the form to the Rec Center or stop in the Rec Center and fill out a reservation request form.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Thursday’s View From The Pugh column features upcoming local events. E-mail
viewfromthepugh@yahoo.com to submit an item for consideration for a future column).

Columbus Zoo, OhioHealth announces walking program

OhioHealth and the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium announced a five-year partnership featuring an exciting new addition to the Zoo, a walking program called “HOOFit.”

HOOFit is designed to raise awareness of the health benefits that Zoo guests are already taking advantage of while walking through the park. The program encourages adults and children to keep track of how many steps they take as they explore the Zoo. Each visitor will receive a step guide when they arrive at the Zoo so they can see how many steps it takes to make it through each region of the Zoo.

Throughout the summer, OhioHealth also will be hosting several organized walks with healthcare experts in areas such as primary care, sports medicine, women’s health and heart health. These dates are: Thursday, June 21; Thursday, July 19; Thursday, August 16; and Thursday, September 27.

REMEMBERING THE FALLEN – On Friday, May 25 at 8:30 a.m., Heritage Christian School students in Kindergarten through 12th grade will gather in the Heritage auditorium for a Memorial Day service to honor and remember those fallen Lincoln High School alumni who gave their lives serving the United States of America.

Heritage Christian School is housed in the former Lincoln High School building at 2107 Sixth St. SW in Canton. All Canton Lincoln High School Alumni and the public are invited to attend this service.

Heritage and the Canton Lincoln High School Alumni Association partnered in a community concert last year to celebrate the 85th anniversary of the building, and to help raise money for renovations.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Thursday’s View From The Pugh column features upcoming local events. E-mail
viewfromthepugh@yahoo.com to submit an item for consideration for a future column).

Mike Huckabee plans Ashland visit

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee will speak at Ashland University on June 28 as the keynote speaker for the 27th Annual John M. Ashbrook Memorial Dinner.

Sponsored by the Ashbrook Center, the event has hosted many political leaders including Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Colin Powell, Margaret Thatcher and John Boehner.

The 7 p.m. dinner program will be held in Ashland University’s John C. Myers Convocation Center. This is an Ashbrook scholarship fundraising event and tickets are $250 per person ($200 of the ticket price is tax deductible). A limited number of VIP reception tickets are available for $500 each. Tables of 10 are available in different price packages and include reception tickets and program recognition.

More information and reservations for the event may be made online at www.ashbrook.org/huckabee or by contacting Lisa M. Ormiston at the Ashbrook Center at (419) 289-5429 or toll-free at (877) 289-5411.

Ashland to host juried art exhibition

The Coburn Gallery at Ashland University announces a national juried exhibition titled “Time will Tell: A Show of Artistic Wisdom and Experience,” which will feature 47 artworks created by artists at least 50 years of age residing in the United States.

This exhibition, which will run from May 18 through June 15, will culminate in a collection of works that embody the creativity and innovation of artists ages 50 years and older at all levels of artistic endeavor.

An opening reception will be held on May 18, from 6 to 7 p.m. with $800 in awards announced at 6:30 p.m.

The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 12 noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday and is free and open to the public. Call 419-289-5652 for more information about the opening reception or the exhibition.

HAZMAT AREA TO BE DEDICATED – The dedication of the Daniel W. Hehr Memorial HazMat Training Area, located on campus in the Renninger building of The University of Findlay’s All Hazards Training Center, will be held May 18 at 3 p.m. The public is invited to attend.

Hehr was the first full-time faculty member of The University of Findlay’s hazardous materials management program. Arriving in 1988, he helped develop and expand the curriculum, which included associate’s and bachelor’s degrees.

ART CAMP SET – Students in Ashland and the surrounding areas are invited to join the Coburn Art Gallery on the Ashland University Campus for a Summer Art Camp, which offers several one-week sessions throughout the summer.

Students ages 7 to 14 will learn how to use a variety of media and experience activities including painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture.

The Session 1 Art Camp activities will include printmaking, Artcheology, drawing and painting and will be held June 18-22 from 1 to 4 p.m. The Session 2 Art Camp activities will include green sculpture, cartooning and papermaking and will be held July 23-27 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Each session is $75 per child and all materials are provided. For more information or to register, call 419.289.5652.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Thursday’s View From The Pugh column features upcoming local events. E-mail
viewfromthepugh@yahoo.com to submit an item for consideration for a future column).

Symphony conductor gives advice to Ashland graduates

Ashland University has given you the necessary instruments to be good leaders in whatever endeavor you choose to engage. Use them in the best possible way with quality and integrity.”

That was the challenge that Ashland Symphony conductor and music director Arie Lipsky presented to graduates during his commencement address at Ashland University’s Spring Commencement ceremony held on Saturday, May 5, at Miller Stadium in the University’s Schar Athletic Complex.

In his speech, titled “Amazing Grace,” Lipsky told the graduates that when they act with quality and integrity, success and prosperity surely will follow.

“Each of you represent the future and aspirations of America. Because of your AU education, you will each treasure and cherish these most fundamental, most American values,” Lipsky said. “But in the real world, do these ideals always hold? Whether they do or do not, will depend entirely on you.”

Lipsky told the graduates that he believes that good and evil, right and wrong do exist.

“This is a clear lesson of our history. We need to sing the praise of the good. We cannot be embarrassed to expose the evil nor be afraid to criticize the wrong,” he said. “These days we are too much surrounded by an atmosphere of political correctness. Sometimes, in an effort not to offend others in this multi-cultural world, we tend to play the wrong notes or the wrong rhythms.”

Lipsky said the challenges in life sometimes seem so difficult that people allow themselves to think that nothing can be done.

“Not true. Apply your creative imaginations to everything you do. Nurture them always with the excellence and values taught here at AU,” he said. “Make these graces, excellence and values the foundations of your futures.”

Lipsky described his personal perspective on the subject of freedom and liberty, ideals which he said are at the very core of the Judeo-Christian values. To do that, he shared some biographical details of his family, which included that his parents were born in Poland.

“The achievement of the great American possibility, continues like a musician, with diligent practice, and is founded on and nourished by simple, abiding belief in yourselves and your country,” he said. “I wish you all a most successful and thriving journey as you begin the next movement in your symphony of life.”

Lipsky ended his speech by playing the hymn “Amazing Grace” on his flute and asking the audience to sing the first and third verses of the song.

Following the commencement address, the presentation of degrees was handled by President Fred Finks and Provost Dr. Frank Pettigrew. A total of 617 degrees (244 graduate and 373 undergraduate) were awarded in the spring 2012 ceremony, including three doctor of education, 169 master of education, 68 master of business administration, four master of American history and government, 54 bachelor of arts, one bachelor of music, 76 bachelor of science, 55 bachelor of science in business administration, 100 bachelor of science in education, 66 bachelor of science in nursing, 14 bachelor of science in social work, three bachelor of fine arts, and four associate of arts.